If you have just been diagnosed with cancer we can help. First we suggest you read our information page which may help explain what emotions you may be feeling, how you and others around you may be reacting to the news and can reassure you that however you find yourself feeling, it is a normal reaction to a cancer diagnosis.

At Cancer Recovery we have spent time researching how individuals have gone on to live with cancer long term and how others have managed their disease until reaching the point of complete recovery. We have interviewed over 16,000 cancer survivors about how they have managed to overcome their diagnosis and move forwards, we would like to share what we learnt with you, so you can apply it to your own cancer journey.

We discovered the key principles and life style changes the cancer survivors had in common and broke them down into 6 basic approaches, which can be followed by anyone diagnosed with cancer to to help their recovery.

Cancer Recovery Pyramid
Our approach to Cancer Recovery can be illustrated as a Pyramid. It is built like all good structures, with a firm foundation. The lower blocks help those above to do their job and are equally important, so pay attention to them all.

 

Medical Treatment

Over 96% of cancer survivors start and complete at least one course of conventional medical treatment. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and immuno-therapy are the most widespread treatment options. Our interviews revealed that 8 out of 10 survivors insisted on a second opinion consultation and  7 in 10 survivors had changed doctors at least once. This shows how survivors take charge of their illness, asking the hard questions of their healthcare team. Learn More…

Nutrition

During and following medical care, dietary change is one of the most common strategies adopted by the survivors of cancer. The increasing importance of nutrition in cancer recovery and for general health has been one of the most significant shifts in the last decade. 8 out of 10 survivors we surveyed make self-described major shifts in dietary and nutritional practices. Food is viewed as part of a total treatment plan. The most common change is a shift to a more plant-based diet, eliminating “whites” (sugar, white flour, white rice, white potatoes and products made with them) and including “colours” (fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, whole grains). Read more…

Exercise

Survivors move. They start and maintain a regular ability-appropriate program of exercise even during cancer treatment cycles. Nearly every survivor we interviewed cite regular exercise as a major component of their recovery program. Learn how to incorporate exercise into your recovery here…

Attitude

Survivors believe there is a very real mind/body connection. They refuse to believe that cancer means death; they believe in their treatments; they believe their role in the recovery process is of primary importance. These beliefs result in a more positive outlook. Survivors view cancer more as a challenge than a threat. 8 in 10 believe their personal self-help efforts account for a major portion of their successful recovery. Survivors are able to choose their emotional responses to life and thus positively influence their recovery. They frame personal responsibility around doing their best to get better. A reason to live is the most important factor is survivorship. Survivors gain a new and greater level of emotional awareness. 7 in 10 believe emotional and psychological factors are major contributors to their illness. 8 in 10 believe these same factors play a major role in how their immune system functions. Survivors focus on healing, not just on fighting the disease. They see themselves as well. Read more…

Support

Survivors invest more time and emotional energy in relationships that nurture them and invest less in relationships that are toxic. 7 in 10 survivors believe support from others was a major contribution in their return to health. Read more…

Meaning & Purpose

9 in 10 cancer survivors regard their core beliefs as one of the most important aspects in their effort to get well and stay well. They embraced a more loving spirit; with inner peace as the result. Over half the survivors believed releasing the past was a major factor – not “forgive and forget,” but rather “forgive and learn.” The detachment from this past hostility frees up personal energy for healing. 8 in 10 survivors now feel their life has a higher purpose, a mission. Gratitude or thankfulness is believed to be a major factor in increasing quality of life. 7 in 10 survivors we interviewed now said they feel a deeper appreciation for life, no matter what the length. Read more…